The Neighbourhood Sustainability Framework

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Defining a successful neighbourhood

Beacon developed the Neighbourhood Sustainability Framework against which New Zealand neighbourhoods can be assessed for their resilience, adaptability, community feel, amenity, and sustainability. 

The Framework is based on local and international research on what makes neighbourhoods work, and is framed around six important elements:


1. Flexibility and adaptability

Can the neighbourhood be continuously adapted to changing needs such as changes in household structureand other socio-economic changes,  transport costs and choices, and the effects of climate change?

2. Neighbourhood satisfaction

 Is the neighbourhood a place that residents will enjoy living,  providing housing quality and condition, durability, street safety, low noise disturbance, and opportunities to get together? 

 3. Minimised costs

Does the neighbourhood minimise the direct and indirect costs for households and cities associated with travel, house construction/  maintenance, infrastructure provision/maintenance, and facility provision/maintenance? 

 4. Effective governance

 Does the neighbourhood encourage neighbours to interact, and provide equitable access to local and city-wide amenities with opportunities for local community participation and governance? 

 5. Resource use

 Does the neighbourhood encourage resource efficiency and conservation in house performance, land use, transport energy consumption, renewable energy and water, and lifecycle impacts? 

6. Environmental protection

Does the neighbourhood protect and enhance the environment by protecting air quality, aquatic health, biodiversity, and soil quality?

 

The Framework considers a neighbourhood to include both the residential and non-residential environments, and how they connect to each other.  This includes:

  • shops
  • community facilities
  • public and open space such as streets, walkways and parks
  • the state of the infrastructure systems
  • services
  • public transport available. 

Also important is the way existing neighbourhoods are used, how people in neighbourhoods behave and get together, and how all elements of a neighbourhood work together. 

 

 


  • 11-Nov-2014 (Publication NH2014/6)

    Guidelines to using the Observational Tool (PDF 92KB)

    Denise Bijoux, Kay Saville-Smith

    These guidelines support use of the Observational Tool which is part of the Neighbourhood Sustainability Framework and Assessment Kit.


  • 11-Nov-2014 (Publication NH2014/5)

    Safety Protocols (NSF Resident Survey Tool) (PDF 70KB)

    Denise Bijoux, Kay Saville-Smith

    These protocols support the Resident Survey (Self-Report) Tool in the Neighbourhood Sustainability Framework and Assessment Kit.


  • 11-Nov-2014 (Publication NH2014/4)

    Interview Ethics and Behaviour (NSF Resident Survey Tool) (PDF 52KB)

    Denise Bijoux, Kay Saville-Smith

    These guidelines for interviewers support the Resident Survey (Self-Report) Tool in the Neighbourhood Sustainability Framework and Assessment Kit.


  • 11-Nov-2014 (Publication NH2014/3)

    Guidelines to using the Resident Survey Tool (PDF 142KB)

    Denise Bijoux, Kay Saville-Smith

    Guidelines to using the Resident Survey (Self-Report) Tool which is part of the Neighbourhood Sustainability Framework and Assessment Kit.


  • 11-Nov-2014 (Publication NH2014/1)

    NSF Resident Survey Tool (Questionnaire) (Word 900KB)

    Denise Bijoux

    The Resident Survey Tool is one of the tools in the Neighbourhood Sustainability Framework and Assessment Kit.  The questionnaire is completed by residents in an existing neighbourhood.